Bridge to Health Blog
Bridge to Health Blog

Anyone for tennis? Common tennis injuries

Written by Mathieu Rossano   Posted in:Osteopathy   July 1, 2015

Anyone for tennis? Common tennis injuries
As the tennis season reaches fever pitch, it is worth sharing with you the sort of injuries that we see and treat in our clinic, and reflect on the lessons to be drawn for patients and athletes alike.

In our two clinics in Ealing and Uxbridge, we get our fair share of injured tennis enthusiasts, tennis instructors, and a number of higher level UK tennis athletes. Ironically, we treat many of them for “tennis elbows” – i.e. elbow tendon strains of the extensor muscles of the wrist.  This condition is far more common among “desk athletes” incurring repetitive strain injury in the elbow as a result of mouse or keypad overuse!

To confuse you a little more, we do come across a few more “golfer’s elbows” – i.e. elbow tendon strains of the flexor muscles of the wrist – amongst tennis players… but the bulk of tennis injuries relates to lower limb mishaps – groin strains, knee lesions, calf tears – and back injuries, such as rib and mid-back joint sub-luxations and pelvic torsions.

Whilst in some cases the injury can be put down to genuine overuse, the most common root-cause relates to the general tendency of even high level athletes not to warm up rigorously enough before play, and equally not to give enough attention to a whole body detailed stretch routine after practice.

I would also offer two other deeper root-causes that underpin these injuries: on the one hand, giving due attention to the appropriate nutrition content and sequences that foster peak nerve impulse and muscle performance; on the other, investing time and energy in additional exercise routines - such as Pilates, yoga and tai chi – that are likely to fuel body frame flexibility and resilience rather than merely power; this new trend in top tennis performance (and sports more generally) is exemplified by athletes such as Novak Djokovic, and explains part at least of what may prove their enduring success.

If you wish to learn more about peak performance nutrition, contact Emily Fawell on 07967 639 347 (for Ealing).  Alternatively if seeking treatment for an injury, contact our osteopathic team on 020 3757 6544 or 01895 2000 50.


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